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Writing for the page vs the stage

Nathan Curnow:
The page and stage are two very different spaces and filling them successfully demands different skills, but they’re also related, just as the line and the breath are related. The blank page can be unforgiving and expose the weaknesses of a poem whereas the stage can throw up so many variables on the night that you have to be on your toes.
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